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Graduate Disciplines.

Be Part of a Rich History of Academic and Professional Success

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Queen’s has a long and impressive academic history in many disciplines, particularly in law, medicine, engineering, business and economics.

At Queen’s, you will find a rich community in which you can interact and contribute to that great tradition.

Click the headings to the right and find out specific graduate discipline information

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 If you are a Queen’s College resident while you are studying Business or Economics at a graduate level, you will be joining a long and impressive tradition of studies in these fields that continues right up to the present.

Almost from the beginning of the College as an academic institution in 1888, students have studied commerce, business and economics. Indeed, a remarkable number of them have gone on to become distinguished practitioners, making significant contributions to the discipline, both as academics and in the worlds of finance and politics. Names that can be mentioned are R. C. Mills, Sir Ian Potter, Harold Holt, Brian Reddaway, Joe Isaac, Max Corden, Geoffrey Harcourt, Ross Williams and Dato Mustapa Mohamed (cabinet minister in Malaysia).

An added attraction for residents at Queen’s is that special events are organised for commerce, business and economics students, including the annual Commerce Dinner. By coming to live at Queen’s as a business graduate student, you can help continue this great tradition of economic studies at one of Melbourne’s leading educational institutions.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are studying Architecture, Construction Management or Urban Planning at a graduate level, you will be joining a long and impressive tradition of studies in these fields that continues right up to the present.

For more than fifty years, students studying Architecture and related fields in the area of design and construction management have resided at the College. Among them was the former President of Council, Mr. John Castles AM. In addition to being a distinguished architect, he is a Past President of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects and is at present, Chairman of Standards Australia. Other well-known architects who have studied at the College are: Peter Freeman and Bruce Allen. The College has a special relationship with John Wardle Architects, national leader in the field of educational architecture.

Not only does Queen’s boast a distinguished architectural heritage in its outstanding collection of buildings dating from the Victoria era to the present, it also has a spacious and well-equipped studio in the Sugden Tower which is available to Design students on a 24/7 basis. In addition, professional liaison events are organized, giving students the opportunity to meet with leading architects and professionals in related areas who have a connection with the College.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are studying Education at a graduate level, you will be joining a long and impressive tradition of studies in this field that continues right up to the present.

Numerous students from Queen’s College have qualified as teachers at every level and have gone out into the world to make their careers in the world of education. Through its alumni and many long-standing relationships, the College is connected to many schools and colleges within the state of Victoria and beyond. The Faculty of Education’s current Dean, Professor Field Rickards, is a distinguished Fellow of the College.

Through the resources of the Featonby Library and the College’s high-speed IT network, Queen’s can offer excellent facilities to students preparing for a career in education. Professional liaison events are also organized, where residents can meet and establish relationships with, leading educators who have a connection with the College.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are studying Engineering at a graduate level, you will be joining a long and impressive tradition of studies in this field that continues right up to the present.

Almost from the beginning of the College as an academic institution in 1888, Engineering and related fields have been studied here. Indeed, over the years a large body of students have studied engineering at Queen’s and many of them have gone on to make significant contributions to the profession. Among them was the late Sir John Holland AC, who was a tutor at Queen’s and later came back many times to visit the College and inspire the students by telling them of his remarkable career and its many triumphs.

An added attraction at Queen’s is that special events are organized for Engineering students, including special dinners for those in engineering and related fields.

By coming to live at Queen’s as an Engineering graduate student, you can help continue this great tradition of study at one of Melbourne’s leading educational institutions.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are studying at the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, you will be joining a long and impressive tradition of studies in this field that continues right up to the present.

Throughout its 120 years of its existence, Queen’s College has had many residents who have distinguished themselves in the various fields of Humanities and Social Sciences. Famous names that come to mind are: Sir Baldwin Spencer (anthropologist), Professor Geoffrey Blainey AC (historian), Professor Ken Inglis AO (historian), Professor Jaynie Anderson (art historian) and, in his own way, Red Symonds (media personality). Through its alumni and friends, the College has an outstanding network that can be of assistance to residents as they advance their knowledge in this field, whether this is in research or in building up administrative and organizational expertise. For example, the College has an academic journal, Aedificamus, which is published every year. Members of the College on high table with masters and doctorates in these fields, such as the Master, the Vice-Master and others, will also be happy to give advice based on their experiences.

Through the resources of the Featonby Library and the College’s high-speed IT network, Queen’s can offer excellent facilities to students studying in the humanities and social science areas. Proximity to university facilities can also be most useful. Talks, lectures, dinners and professional liaison events are organized, which will stimulate graduate students and assist them as they commence their career paths.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are studying Graduate Law, you will be joining an amazing tradition of legal studies that continues right up to the present.

Judge Thomas Clyne was a law student who continued to live at Queen’s long after he had finished his studies, served as a barrister and was elevated to the bench. After thirty-six years of residence he got married and finally chose to leave the College. To this day top members of the legal profession and law academics live at the College; they give tutorials and assist law students in whatever way they can.

The highlight of the year for Law students at Queen’s is the Queen’s Inn dinner, which has been held annually at the College since 1966 and has boasted eminent speakers such as Sir Garfield Barwick, Gough Whitlam, Chief Justice Marilyn Warren, and many others. The dinner is regularly attended by Justices and QC’s who formerly resided at the College. Three Justices of the Supreme Court of Victoria are Fellows of Queen’s College.

By coming to live at Queen’s as a Graduate Law student you can help continue this great tradition of legal studies at one of Melbourne’s leading educational institutions.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are studying Medicine or other graduate health science courses, you will be joining an impressive tradition of medical studies that continues right up to the present.

During the first 90 years of the College’s history, most medical students stayed the entire six years of the medical course at Queen’s. Numerous distinguished medical practitioners and researchers studied here and many of them continued as tutors after graduating. In recent times, the College has continued to have resident medical tutors, many of whom are doing periods of residency at nearby academic hospitals.

The highlight of the year for Health Science students at Queen’s is the Health Science Dinner, which has been held annually at the College for many decades and has boasted many eminent speakers, such as Peter Doherty (Nobel prize winner), Ian Taylor (plastic surgeon), Andrew Tonkin (Heart Foundation), John Harris (orthopaedic surgeon), John Orchard (sports surgeon), and many more. The dinner is great for networking, because it is attended by many medical practitioners who are connected in various ways with the College.

By coming to live at Queen’s as an MD or a health science graduate student you can help continue this great tradition of medical studies at one of Melbourne’s leading educational institutions.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are doing research in the areas of science, the humanities and the social sciences, at the Master’s, PhD or Honours level, you will be joining a long and impressive list of researchers who have studied at the College.

Throughout the more than 120 years of its existence, numerous students at Queen’s have started their research careers while studying at the College or have completed their research degrees while members of high table, i.e. as tutors and academic mentors to the undergraduate students.

Some names that come to mind are the scientists Sir David Rivett (founder of CSIRO) and David Vaux, the medical scientists Sir Douglas Wright, David Penington and Richard Pestell, the historians Geoffrey Blainey, Ken Inglis and Wilfrid Prest, the theologians Eric Osborn and Norman Young, and so on. The present Master is a distinguished classicist and historian of philosophy, with doctorates from Amsterdam and the University of Melbourne. The Vice-Master has a PhD in the social history of sport. A number of members of the Senior Common Room have completed doctorates. In addition, many visiting scholars and scientists reside here for shorter and longer periods, making significant contributions to the academic and intellectual atmosphere of the College.

If you are thinking of embarking on an academic career, it is obvious that there will be numerous advantages to becoming part of an academic community. The close connections that the College has with the University, the excellent Library and IT facilities which it can offer, the close proximity to the University and other nationally eminent research facilities such as the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and the Howard Florey Institute — all of these factors make it an ideal place to live when doing research in any field.

If you come to Queen’s College to live while you are studying Science at a graduate level, you will be joining a long and impressive tradition of students and studies in this field that continues right up to the present.

Throughout the more than 120 years of its existence, numerous residents at Queen’s College have studied science beyond the undergraduate level and contributed to scientific research. Famous alumni that spring to mind are Sir David Rivett (first Director of CSIRO), Dr Stephen Morton (current board member CSIRO), and Professor David Vaux (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, winner of the Victorian Science Prize). Through its alumni and friends, the College has an outstanding network that can be of assistance to residents as they pursue their scientific studies. Members of the College on high table with doctorates in science are also happy to give advice based on their experiences.

The proximity of the College to University departments and laboratories can be a great advantage for graduate students as they do experimental research. The College’s high-speed IT network also provides excellent (and free) connectivity to the University. In addition, talks, lectures, dinners and professional liaison events are organized which will stimulate science graduate students and assist them as they commence their career paths.